United Methodist Church in the United States by Race (2016)
White: 90%       Black: 6%        Hispanic/Latino: 1%        Asian/PI: 1.7%    Native American: 0.3%    Other: 1%

Public School Enrollment By Race K-12 (2018)
White: 47.7%    Black: 15.7%   Hispanic/Latino: 27.1%    Asian/PI: 5.5%   Native American: 1.2%    Other:  0.5%

http://www.gcfa.org/services/data-services/statistical-resources/
https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d16/tables/dt16_203.50.asp
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While older generations think of diversity in terms of cultural awareness, Generation Z is creating a new emerging culture that reflects its diverse population, with over 50% of its generation being Black, Asian, Hispanic, Native American, Pacific Islander, and two or more races.  But this isn’t all, over 26% have at least one parent who was born outside the United States, making it a generation with a global perspective unlike any other American generation that has come before.

The challenge for the United Methodist Church is that its current membership in the United States does not reflect the demographics and thus the cultural perspectives of the young.

In this podcast, we will examine the implications of this new diversity and learn about the concept of homeland.

Join Chris Wilterdink and Craig Kennet Miller, with guest Michelle Maldonado, Director of Seeker Advertising & Communications at United Methodist Communications, as they continue the series on The New Youth Boom.  In this “The Future Of…Podcast” they invite listeners to focus on Diversity.

Listen to the previous podcast in this series:

The New Youth Boom: 01//Voice

The New Youth Boom: 02//Screens

The challenge for the United Methodist Church is that its current membership in the United States does not reflect the demographics of Generation Z and thus the cultural perspectives of the young. While 90% of United Methodists in the United States are white, only 47% of public school students are from the same group. The youngest among us are growing up in a diverse youth culture that is vastly different from previous generations and as a result, they are creating a global, multi-ethnic, multi-lingual, technologically sophisticated culture that is calling into question cherished norms of their parents and grandparents.